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Worth the Risk

Sep 11 2016 • Greg Boyd, Seth McCoy

The goal of self-fulfillment is killing us, and the struggle to make and follow through on commitments is getting harder. Making and keeping covenant relationships is risky, but highly rewarding: choosing a career; getting and staying married; sticking in friendships when they get hard; fighting for and investing in family; committing to a church community. Instead of trying to become who we want to be, what happens when we decide to stick in something long enough for it to change who we are?

Sermons in this series:


Risky Church

• Greg Boyd

In this final sermon of the Worth the Risk series, we look at how the cross offends our worldly values, and how we as followers, and the church as a whole, are called to respond to this confrontation.

Topics: Community, Covenant, Kingdom of God


Risky Family

• Greg Boyd

We often craft together ideal images of of what a “good Christian” family ought to look like. Images of the idealistic post-war, bourgeois nuclear families are more frequently articulated as the “biblical” family. But, is that accurate? Greg provides for us a snapshot of the various families portrayed throughout the biblical narrative. From Adam and Eve to Solomon and his many wives and concubines, to Abraham and Sarah, we gather a sense that “biblical” families are just as messy and dysfunctional as what we may witness today. The hope of the family unit is Christ! The Christ who works within the mess of it all to make something beautiful.

Topics: Conflict, Family, Kingdom of God


Risky Friendship

• Seth McCoy

Being made in the image of God means that we are created to make and keep commitments. In this second segment of our Worth the Risk series, Seth explores commitment’s role in our relationships. A kingdom relationship is a creation in and of itself, and that creation requires constant care in the form of honest conversations about the things that come between us. Our tendency is to avoid conflict, confrontation, and rebuke because we believe a lie. We believe we can’t be honest and keep our friendships, but like all forms of deception this lie leads to relational death.

Topics: Community, Conflict, Kingdom of God


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